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#14132 - 09/09/14 10:45 PM Re: Sandpiper 565 Restoral [Re: Mark S]
kenn Offline
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Registered: 03/08/08
Posts: 1110
Loc: Toronto ON
 Originally Posted By: Mark S
I am going to start sanding and repairing fiberglass shortly. I only have a palm vibrating sander but I am looking at buying a DeWalt 5 In Random Orbital Sander.


On our boat, I've only used power-tools for sanding when doing a repair: a 4" grinder with a sanding disc to remove and taper around a hole or crack prior to repair, same and a palm sander to smooth out a hardened repair. Where I sanded to remove oxidation or scratches, I used wet paper (600 or 1000). Yes I lightly sanded the whole hull by hand. It wasn't that bad, gave me much more control, and by using wet sandpaper and rinsing frequently... no dust in the air.

Before you go deep into tool costs, get a piece of 1000 wet/dry paper (you'll find it with the auto-body stuff at Canadian Tire), get it wet and do some light test hand-sanding on a heavily-oxidized part of the hull. Sand, wipe, look, sand, wipe, look etc, and you should start seeing stronger colour.

I did buy an orbital polisher which I used to work some rubbing compound and to polish and buff.

Best article I know of for hull polishing.. I followed most of these steps. I didn't kill myself trying for a mirror finish, I just went for clean, smooth, decently reflective after wax.
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#14133 - 09/10/14 04:09 PM Re: Sandpiper 565 Restoral [Re: kenn]
Mark S Offline
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Registered: 08/09/08
Posts: 360
Loc: Shelburne Ontario
Thanks for the article on hull polishing. It is amazing how well oxidation was removed and how shinny hull looked after work was done. My deck is not in bad shape so I might look at removing oxidation and giving it a good shine. The hull is a different story and I am currently looking for links to repair deep scratches and prepare hull for painting. I looking into rolling and tipping paint but I think it will be much harder to do then the videos I have seen on Youtube.



Edited by Mark S (09/10/14 04:14 PM)

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#14135 - 09/10/14 10:01 PM Re: Sandpiper 565 Restoral [Re: Mark S]
kenn Offline
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Registered: 03/08/08
Posts: 1110
Loc: Toronto ON
Dave V (CL) has official gelcoat for the Sandpiper 'white' which is actually sort of cream, so I've been able to make gelcoat repairs on our hull that are invisible. I don't know if he could match your blue, but you might want to drop him an email to ask.

If you're still intending to paint, you can fill the scratches with any colour gelcoat.

Guide to painting. Dat painted their hull and it looked great. I hear it's actually not that hard to roll & tip, and the paint is formulated to flow just enough that brushmarks disappear.
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#14140 - 09/11/14 06:03 PM Re: Sandpiper 565 Restoral [Re: kenn]
Mark S Offline
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Registered: 08/09/08
Posts: 360
Loc: Shelburne Ontario
Thanks for the guide to painting link Ken. I think I am going to paint the hull as I really don't like the hull color and it is in need of repair. My first task now is to remove the remainder of hardware and then remove antifouling paint using Aqua Strip Paint Stripper. My big issue right now is getting the time to do it. Oh well, need to work to make the money, to fix the boat.
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#14141 - 09/12/14 12:22 AM Re: Sandpiper 565 Restoral [Re: Mark S]
Shortwave Offline
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Registered: 11/16/10
Posts: 874
I've helped guys do their final sanding and to get a really really smooth finish with no little indentations they would glue the sandpiper on to a long piece of flexible thin plywood. It's a bit tedious, but you get a very smooth fair hull.

D'Arcy, Shortwave

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#14142 - 09/12/14 05:10 AM Re: Sandpiper 565 Restoral [Re: Shortwave]
Mark S Offline
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Registered: 08/09/08
Posts: 360
Loc: Shelburne Ontario
Hi Shortwave. Thanks for the tip I will give that a try. Everything I have read says that preparation...preparation...preparation is the most important part. I guess you could compare it to drywallling. You want to have a very smooth surface with no indentations. If anybody else has any tips or experiences to share I would appreciate it. I have been on the Interlux site looking at antifouling paint. Does anybody have any suggestions as I was surprised how many types there were available. Do to the fact there is the possibility I could have the boat in the water up to a few days at a time I want to use something. Generally the boat will be stored on trailer under a shelter. Due to the fact boat will be in and out of water I guess it should be mult season paint and something that will handle abrasion of going on/off of trailer.

Interlux Anitfouling Paint

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#14144 - 09/12/14 07:49 AM Re: Sandpiper 565 Restoral [Re: Mark S]
Boulter Offline
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Registered: 04/13/14
Posts: 195
Loc: Central Ontario
 Originally Posted By: Mark S
Do to the fact there is the possibility I could have the boat in the water up to a few days at a time I want to use something. Generally the boat will be stored on trailer under a shelter. Due to the fact boat will be in and out of water I guess it should be mult season paint and something that will handle abrasion of going on/off of trailer.


My boat came with VC-17 which is now just dead weight because it becomes ineffective with hauling. I have sailed two seasons now with no effective bottom paint, and never tried to wash the bottom either. It has a light green patina +- the water line, so most of the cosmetic issues are not on the bottom and bottom paint would not help.

My plan long term is to "bottom paint" with a pressure washer. I dragged a gas one home from a garage sale for $25. Will I be lucky?

What is your reasoning for bottom paint? Racers use VC17 because it is slick with teflon in the formulation. If you want slick and dry docking, you will have to work it by hand (as above VC17 is incompatible with hauling). If cosmetics, I really think a power washer will be less money and work in the long term, but I defer to others with real experience.

Boulter
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#14145 - 09/12/14 05:20 PM Re: Sandpiper 565 Restoral [Re: Boulter]
Mark S Offline
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Registered: 08/09/08
Posts: 360
Loc: Shelburne Ontario
I am going to go with interlux Micron Extra as it is good for boats that are hauled and relaunched on a regular basis. I think there will be times when I will leave boat in water for up to a week so I want the protection. But leaving boat out of the water for an extended period will be fine with Micron extra.


Micron® Technology
For boats that are going to be hauled and relaunched on a regular basis or hauled for seasonal storage consider using Micron antifouling paints. Micron antifouling paints can be hauled and relaunched without repainting since the biocides are chemically bound to the paint film and are only active when in the water. The longevity of these coatings is related to the thickness of the paint.

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#14146 - 09/12/14 06:26 PM Re: Sandpiper 565 Restoral [Re: Boulter]
kenn Offline
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Registered: 03/08/08
Posts: 1110
Loc: Toronto ON
 Originally Posted By: Boulter
[My boat came with VC-17 which is now just dead weight because it becomes ineffective with hauling.


Can you expand on that? Starting this year, our boat's been in water all season, so I went with VC-17 before launch.. We did haul out for the Rendezvous, which means 2 in/outs. Where the rollers sit against the hull, the anti-fouling wore through from the travelling, but otherwise it remained pretty much intact. My understanding is that if you can see the VC-17 antifouling, it's still there and will still work.
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#14147 - 09/12/14 08:02 PM Re: Sandpiper 565 Restoral [Re: kenn]
Mark S Offline
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Registered: 08/09/08
Posts: 360
Loc: Shelburne Ontario
Hard or contact leaching antifouling paint dries to a hard but porous film that is packed with biocide. The biocide begins to leach out on contact with water to prevent fouling growth. This leaching is chemically designed to release biocide while the boat is in the water. Out of the water the paint film will oxidize and slow the release of the biocides to the point where there may not be enough biocide coming out of the paint film to maintain fouling protection. One of the main benefits of this type of antifouling is its resistance to abrasion and rubbing. This makes it ideal for fast powerboats, racing sailboats or boats where the owners have the bottoms scrubbed regularly.

Hard antifoulings from Interlux® include Ultra, Ultra-Kote®, Fiberglass Bottomkote®, Fiberglass Bottomkote® Aqua, Super KL, Epoxycop, VC® Offshore and Baltoplate®

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